September 08, 2017

Kellyanne Conway on telling her kids about having respect for, but not supporting, Hillary Clinton

Counselor to the President Kellyanne Conway is breaking down just how she explained to her children that she wasn't supporting Hillary Clinton in the 2016 presidential election.

Conway, who hails from South Jersey, touched on the topic during a feature for Time magazine covering "women who are changing the world," a special multimedia project released Thursday.

Conway, who got the spotlight for becoming the first woman to run a winning presidential campaign, focused on paving her way in the male-dominated world of politics in a three-minute-long video clip for the magazine. She also spoke about the line between having respect for someone but still being able to disagree with a person and "share in that moment in history."

"I would be remiss in not sharing the full conversation [about the election]," Conway said, elaborating on how she explained "why mommy, who's a woman, did not support the first female presidential candidate of a major party."

"I would tell them that I respect very much that Secretary Clinton was running for president, and it showed that in this country, anybody can do anything if they set their mind to it," said Conway, who has three daughters and one son. "At the same time, I tried to explain to them that you could be excited for someone with whom you disagree and share in that moment in history as a proud American."

Conway touched on being raised by a strong group of women she nicknamed "South Jersey's versions of the Golden Girls" and how she often thought back to former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher's famous quote, "Being powerful is like being a lady. If you have to tell people you are, you aren't," while rising in the political ranks. 

Time's "Firsts: Women Who Are Changing the World" profiles 46 groundbreaking women, including TV hosts Ellen DeGeneres and Oprah Winfrey, U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley, Philadelphia's Mo'ne Davis and Clinton, too.

Watch Conway's interview below or check out Time's special project here.