Crime Mob
Art Heist Mystery Cloe Poisson/AP

FILE - In this April 20, 2015, file photo, Robert Gentile is brought into the federal courthouse in a wheelchair for a continuation of a hearing in Hartford, Conn. Gentile, a reputed Connecticut mobster who authorities say is the last surviving person of interest in the largest art heist in U.S. history, is set to be sentenced on unrelated weapons convictions. He is scheduled to be sentenced Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2017, in federal court in Hartford. (Cloe Poisson/The Courant via AP, File)

September 05, 2017

Man tied to $500M art heist to be sentenced in separate case

HARTFORD, Conn. — A reputed Connecticut mobster who authorities say is the last surviving person of interest in the largest art heist in U.S. history is set to be sentenced on unrelated weapons convictions.

Robert Gentile is scheduled to be sentenced Tuesday in federal court in Hartford.

Prosecutors have said they believe the 81-year-old Manchester resident has information about the still-unsolved 1990 heist at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston. Thieves stole an estimated $500 million worth of artwork, including works by Rembrandt, Edouard Manet, Edgar Degas and Johannes Vermeer.

Gentile has denied knowing anything about the theft.

Gentile pleaded guilty in April in connection with the seizure of firearms and ammunition from his home by federal agents. The plea deal calls for him to serve three to six years in prison.