Donovan McNabb stands by comments on Eagles' Carson Wentz

Former Philadelphia Eagles quarterback Donovan McNabb, seen above at a Phoenix Suns game in March 2018, backed up his comment on Tuesday that current Eagles quarterback Carson Wentz needs to get the team to the NFC Championship in the next two years or the Eagles should consider drafting his successor.
Mark J. Rebilas/USA TODAY Sports

Former Philadelphia Eagles quarterback Donovan McNabb is not backing down from his comments about the high bar set for Carson Wentz in the coming years.

The mini-controversy began Saturday when McNabb told CBS Sports Radio's Zach Gelb that Wentz must lead the Eagles to the NFC Championship Game in the next two years, at a minimum, or else the Eagles should consider drafting his potential replacement.

Those remarks touched off a storm of local reactions against McNabb, including from Eagles offensive lineman Lane Johnson, who questioned the underlying reasons for McNabb's negative outlook.

On Tuesday afternoon, McNabb joined Joe DeCamara and Ike Reese on SportsRadio 94WIP to address the fallout of his comments.

"All I was doing was being an analyst and honest in my comments," McNabb said.

He added, in response to questions about Johnson's criticism, "I don't play Twitter war games with kids."

The full interview can be heard below.

McNabb's cackling introduction to the interview probably says more about why fans reacted so strongly than anything he actually said. He just seems to relish in not feeling beholden to the Eagles or their fan base — which, considering the way he's been portrayed, is actually pretty understandable.

"I don't receive any checks from the Philadelphia Eagles? Do I?" McNabb asked. "I have no problems with the Philadelphia Eagles. My relationship is the same as when I played."

As for his relationship with Wentz, McNabb said he feels he has a good connection with the young quarterback, and he said the two have spoken on multiple occasions.

"There's no dirt in between me and him," McNabb said, explaining that he chooses not to go public about his interactions with Wentz, whether they relate to his successes or struggles on the field.

If anyone was looking for an apology or contrition out of McNabb, it didn't come in this interview. The best outcome from all of the questions surrounding Wentz is that he uses it to prove his doubters wrong for years to come.