Joseph Santoliquito

Joseph Santoliquito

Joseph Santoliquito is an award-winning sportswriter based in the Philadelphia area who has written feature stories for SI.com, ESPN.com, NFL.com, MLB.com, Deadspin and The Philadelphia Daily News. In 2006, he was nominated for an Emmy Award for a special project piece for ESPN.com called “Love at First Beep.” He is most noted for his award-winning ESPN.com feature on high school wrestler A.J. Detwiler in February 2006, which appeared on SportsCenter. In 2015, he was elected president of the Boxing Writers Association of America.

September 6, 2017

Eagles

'Go ahead and doubt me' – Eagles' Pumphrey out to prove critics wrong (again)

Hunkie Cooper shook his head and leaned back in his office chair with a grin on his face. One of his players was caught using a cell phone in class again. This time, it was his star, Donnel Pumphrey. Cooper, then the football coach at Canyon Springs High School in North Las Vegas, Nevada, grew used to the inquiries over time about Pumphrey.

September 5, 2017

Boxing

Insiders: Floyd Mayweather Jr. thought so little of Conor McGregor that he barely trained at all

Mayweather barely ran in preparation for McGregor, according to multiple sources. In other words, Mayweather showed up at about a 50-percent version of himself and still dominated one of the world’s best fighters.

August 27, 2017

Sports

As expected, Floyd Mayweather dismantles Conor McGregor – then announces retirement

LAS VEGAS — Conor McGregor certainly had to know. He’s too smart not to have known what he was getting into when he agreed to fight Floyd Mayweather in a boxing match.

August 25, 2017

Boxing

'I can hurt people' – Mayweather isn't known for his power, but he's got enough to knock out McGregor

LAS VEGAS — A devilish grin crept across Floyd Mayweather’s face, because he’s heard it before. Too many times, in fact. How he can’t punch. How his shots feel more like pinpricks than actual punches from a supposed world-class fighter. He’s been boxing since he was three years old, the gloves dangling from his sides, almost as big as he was then. 

August 1, 2017

Eagles

Brandon Brooks' busy offseason: Two internships, tons of travel and preparing for playoffs

The beaming smile winds it away through the maze of reporters, and cameramen, and lockers, and teammates, and stray equipment and helmets lying around. The beaming smile works its way to the back of the Eagles’ NovaCare Complex dressing room. 

July 31, 2017

Sixers

Sixers' Dave Sholler giving back to A.C. Rescue Mission that helped his family in time of need

The narrow eight-foot long corridor of faded wood paneling and laminated grayish tiles served as the Spectrum and Veterans Stadium to the four of them. It was an imaginary world where the Phillies, Flyers, 76ers and Eagles always won. It was where Dave Sholler and his three younger siblings could be Duce Staley or Randall Cunningham running for a touchdown, or Allen Iverson driving to the basket, or Eric Lindros scoring a goal. 

July 2, 2017

The Q&A

The Q&A ... with 97.5 The Fanatic host Mike Missanelli

Mike Missanelli is polarizing and some of his compatriots on the local sports talk radio scene definitely say he’s provocative. There is one thing that can’t be disputed about him: When he talks, people listen.

June 26, 2017

Concussions

At CHOP, helping to see a better way to diagnose concussions

Out of concern that brain-injured patients would be unable to follow instructions to allow spatial calibration, Dr. Uzma Samadani's team had to develop a different method of eye tracking to diagnose concussions.

June 7, 2017

Lacrosse

Is Matt Rambo the greatest lacrosse player to ever come out of Philadelphia?

Matt Rambo wouldn’t be Matt Rambo if during one of the most rewarding moments of his life he didn’t do something memorable. Rambo was one of five finalists for the 2017 Tewaaraton Award—college lacrosse’s Heisman Trophy—standing there on stage last Thursday before a huge crowd at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of the American Indian in Washington D.C. 

May 18, 2017

Eagles

An oral history of trash talk in the NFL – and why there's less now than ever

It’s fading more now, possibly left behind like the brutal forearm hits to the head, or the way the late Andre Waters would submarine a running back at the knees. Through each decade, it seems, the National Football League has grabbed its dirty laundry, power washed it, shook it dry and ironed it, working out the creases from the 1980s through the current game we have today. 

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