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Positive pregnancy test

December 27, 2016

Woman allegedly pays way through college by selling positive pregnancy tests

A Florida woman is doing whatever she can to pay her way through college – that includes selling her positive pregnancy tests.

The anonymous woman took to Craigslist to place an ad that's since been removed.


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Huffington Post, however, got a hold of the listing earlier this month before it had been taken down. It read:

"Very self explanatory I am 3 months and I am providing a product in which the consumer is able to purchase positive preganancy test or urine for your own use. Whether you are using it for your own amusement such as a prank, or to blackmail the ceo of where ever who you are having an affair with I DONT CARE AT ALL this is an absolutely no questions asked type of deal tell me what you need I provide it for monetary exchange. I will not overcharge for the urine test but I will not be low balled either do not contact me if you are going to be cheap and difficult. Email me then I will exchange phone contact due to scammers I removed my number. Feel free to contact when you need to i check my email every HR for those traveling over 60 miles I will give 2 tests for $35."

The woman, who agreed to speak to a local news station anonymously, told a reporter she could make as much as $200 a day from the pregnancy tests, money that helped her pay for school.

“Me being in college, working on a bachelor’s and needing all this money to pay for a degree, this was a no-brainer,” she told the station. 

While it's a pretty crazy way to pay for school and, according to the station, might even be considered fraud, it's not the craziest thing that a student's ever done.

CBS News reported in 2013 that one University of Wisconsin student became a competitive eater to ease his college debt, and a New York University student made the school library his home when he couldn't afford his bills, the Associated Press reported in 2004.

And for Philadelphia? There aren't any shocking cases out there that we're away of, although more than 100 Temple University students allegedly looked online for a "sugar daddy" on the website Seeking Arrangement last January.

A former Northampton Community College student also admitted to selling marijuana on campus to help pay his way for school, The Morning Call reported in November.

Taking a similar but also much different entrepreneurial route, Christopher Gray, a Drexel University student, won an episode of the show "Shark Tank" after pitching his idea, an app called Scholly, that connects students to scholarships.

Gray said he got more than $1.3 million himself by applying to scholarships in school. 

“It took me several months to even find scholarships I wanted to apply for,” Gray told BET, which named him one of its 30 Young Men on the Brink of Making It Big. “This [app] is to help students find scholarships they apply for in minutes.”