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September 05, 2019

Director Kevin Smith blasts photo theft in keto weight loss phishing scam

Celebrities Scams
Kevin Smith weight loss Sthanlee B. Mirador/Sipa USA

Kevin Smith, director of the upcoming "Jay and Silent Bob Reboot," says his photo was stolen to be used in a phishing scam for ketogenic diet pills. Smith claims he never took the pills before and never said the words attributed to him.

Kevin Smith has a had a whirlwind couple of years.

The New Jersey-born director has lost nearly 60 pounds since he suffered a massive heart attack between comedy sets in Feb. 2018.

That weight loss journey has been well-documented by Smith himself, who attributes most of his success to adopting a vegan lifestyle and then becoming a Weight Watchers ambassador.

With just over a month to go before the premiere of "Jay and Silent Bob Reboot," Smith took to Instagram to call out a phishing scam that exploits his weight loss story.

View this post on Instagram

PHISHING PHUCKERS! This image and the click-through link is being posted to folks’ @facebook pages WITHOUT MY PERMISSION! The link attached to the stolen image that I posted on @instagram last year leads to a phishing site, so DO NOT CLICK! This ad is pure bullshit. I never did Keto: to lose weight after my heart attack, I went Vegan and then joined @ww (who made me a #wwambassador). That quote attributed to me is not only grammatically incorrect, I believe it’s also fabricated, as I’ve *never* jogged and the only pills I take are heart-related prescriptions mandated by my cardiologist. If anybody has any link info for this fraud, please provide in the comments below. But most importantly, don’t believe anybody trying to sell you on a weight loss pill, whether using my image and a fake pull quote or not. Fuck, I feel like Homer when he found that Mr. Sparkle box... #KevinSmith #bullshit

A post shared by Kevin Smith (@thatkevinsmith) on

Last summer, Smith shared the photo above as a joke to recreate the famous "jorts" photo snapped by a paparazzo during his heftier days.

The phishing scam claims Smith lost weight by adopting the high-fat, low-carb ketogenic diet and jogging every few days. Oh, and "taking these pills."

"That quote attributed to me is not only grammatically incorrect, I believe it’s also fabricated, as I’ve *never* jogged and the only pills I take are heart-related prescriptions mandated by my cardiologist," Smith wrote.

Of all the people in the world who might be the cover celebrity for a weight loss phishing scam, Kevin Smith would never have seemed to fit the type.

The URL seen at the top of the photo shared by Smith doesn't even load, so it appears the fraud has been pulled down. As for the Keto HD pills, they're being hawked from a variety of flimsy and unusual sites with suspicious guarantees of 100% satisfaction.

Other celebrities, including Meghan Markle and Briana and Ryan Culberson, have been exploited in similar scams for ketogenic diet pills.

One site purporting to address whether Keto HD is a scam features a long review written in atrocious English.

"At case you truly have to get this recipe and whatever should really be discounted, at the time you certainly can accomplish this in the shape of these website," the page explains.

Right. You're probably going to want to stay away from Keto HD capsules.

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