Tracey Romero

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Tracey Romero is a Philadelphia-based health and science journalist. Her work has appeared in Cardiology Today, Orthopedics This Week and the Philadelphia Inquirer. She loves to write about the personal side of medicine. Follow her on Twitter @trarom.

tracey@phillyvoice.com

December 1, 2021

Health News

FDA advisors narrowly vote to recommend Merck's COVID-19 pill for emergency use

Merck's experimental COVID-19 antiviral pill was recommended for emergency use authorization by a U.S. Food and Drug Administration advisory panel. Still, the committee expressed concerns regarding the efficacy of molnupiravir and the potential side effects to unborn children.

December 1, 2021

Children's Health

Drinking alcohol while pregnant significantly alters the baby's brain structure, MRIs reveal

The brain structure of fetuses exposed to alcohol significantly differs from the developing brains other unborn babies, a new MRI-based study shows. Unborn babies exposed to alcohol have a larger corpus collosum – the main connection between the brain's two hemispheres – and a smaller periventricular zone, the area where neurons originate.

December 1, 2021

Adult Health

A good night's sleep can be elusive for many people with type 2 diabetes

About half of people with type 2 diabetes have trouble sleeping because of unstable blood sugar levels and other disease-related symptoms, like increased thirst and headaches. Studies have shown that insufficient and irregular sleep, as well as repeated awakenings, can cause insulin resistance. For people with prediabetes or diabetes, this means that poor sleep can worsen their conditions.

November 30, 2021

Women's Health

Getting COVID-19 while pregnant does not affect the baby's brain development, study says

A mild to moderate coronavirus infection in a pregnant woman will not harm the development of her baby's brain, a new study shows. Still, contracting COVID-19 during pregnancy increases the risk of severe illness and preterm and stillbirth. Experts urge pregnant women to get vaccinated.

November 29, 2021

Illness

Chronic fatigue syndrome may provide valuable insights into long COVID

Post-COVID syndrome and chronic fatigue syndrome are similar on a molecular level. Further research into these common biomarkers could result in better treatments for both conditions, scientists say.

November 29, 2021

Fitness

To make exercise a habit, start with a plan and find ways to make it fun

Developing good habits is the key to sticking to an exercise regimen. Behavioral health scientists stress the importance of repetition and setting attainable goals. Finding ways to make workouts more fun and exercising with friends also can be helpful.

November 24, 2021

Adult Health

The COVID-19 pandemic is still adversely impacting cancer screenings, study finds

The COVID-19 pandemic is still adversely affecting cancer care, according to a new study. Many people who need imaging to detect cancers are still not getting it, raising concerns of more advanced cancers and worse outcomes. Volumes for cancer screening and initial workups have not fully recovered to their pre-pandemic levels.

November 24, 2021

Men's Health

Most yoga classes are filled with women, but men can benefit from it too

Basic yoga poses, called asanas, can help men increase their strength and flexibility. But there are many reasons why men should consider doing yoga. Research has shown it leads to better sleep, improved sex life, improved posture. It also provides heart benefits and improves brain function.

November 23, 2021

Illness

Alcoholism drug has potential as a COVID-19 treatment, but studies are just getting underway

Disulfiram, a treatment for alcoholism, may reduce the risk of severe COVID-19 and death, according to a new observational study. Researchers emphasize that more studies are needed. But their study of more than 900,000 U.S. veterans found that people taking disulfiram were 34% less likely to get COVID-19.

November 23, 2021

Adult Health

Knee replacements don't always alleviate pain – in these cases, a minimally invasive procedure may help

A minimally invasive treatment to arthritic knee pain may be on the horizon for people who still experience pain and stiffness after knee replacements. Some researchers view cooled radiofrequency ablation as a better option than putting patients through another knee replacement, which offers no guarantee of relief.

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