More Health:

August 24, 2018

Sen. John McCain discontinuing treatments for brain cancer

Arizona Republican is doing so 'with his usual strength of will,' family says

Health News John McCain
John_McCain_brain_cancer_announcement Tom Tingle/The Republic via USA Today Network

Sen. John McCain poses at the Republic Media building.

Sen. John McCain will no longer continue medical treatments for brain cancer, his family announced on Friday.

The Arizona Republican was diagnosed last year with aggressive glioblastoma and given a serious prognosis, according to a statement released by McCain's family. McCain first publically shared his cancer diagnosis last summer.

"In the year since, John has surpassed expectations for his survival," the McCain family statement read. "But the progress of disease and the inexorable advance of age render their verdict. With his usual strength of will, he has now chosen to discontinue medical treatment."

The Vietnam War hero has served in the U.S. Senate since 1987, gaining a reputation for working across the aisle and being unafraid to break with Republicans. He twice ran for president and was the 2008 Republican presidential nominee. In recent years, he has been a vocal critic of President Donald Trump.

McCain, who was tortured while being held captive during the Vietnam War, received the Liberty Medal last year at the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia, where he decried "half-baked, spurious nationalism."

McCain's family thanked his caregivers and the "continuing outpouring of concern and affection" offered by his friends and associates.

In tweeting the statement, Cindy McCain wrote "I love my husband with all of my heart. God bless everyone who has cared for my husband along this journey."

McCain's daughter, Meghan, also tweeted out the statement.

Glioblastoma, which occurs in the brain or spinal cord, typically occurs in older adults, causing increasingly painful headaches, nausea, vomiting and seizures, according to the Mayo Clinic.

The disease is difficult to treat and often a cure is not possible. But treatments may slow its progress and reduce symptoms.


Follow John & PhillyVoice on Twitter: @WriterJohnKopp | @thePhillyVoice
Like us on Facebook: PhillyVoice
Add John's RSS feed to your feed reader
Have a news tip? Let us know.