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June 30, 2017

Four ways to protect your pets this Fourth of July

More pets go missing between July 4-6 than any other time of year

Do you have a dog that is totally terrified of fireworks? You're not alone. 

But what you may not know is that between July 4-6 more pets reportedly go missing than any other time of the year. 

According to national statistics from PetAmberAlert.comanimal control officials across the country see a 30-60 percent annual increase in lost pets between July 4-6, with July 5 slated as one of the busiest days of the year for shelters.

The site says only 14 percent of lost pets are returned to their owners, and worse, 30-60 percent are euthanized because of shelter space limitations and other factors.

Below are four ways to protect your pet this Fourth of July.


 

TAKE YOUR PET FOR A LONG WALK

The idea here is that a tired pup is a less anxious pup come fireworks time. After a walk, your dog will hopefully be able to maintain its mellow mode, and maybe even nap, come the commotion. 


LEAVE PETS HOME

It may sound like a nice idea to take your dog along on a family outing to sit and watch the fireworks. But for many dogs being home in a safe environment that they are aware of may be a more secure and comfortable option

A tip to muffle out the booming sounds coming from outside is to leave on a TV, music and/or a white noise machine. Just take note that the TV channel you choose isn't planning to air fireworks shows, which would only add to the issue.

NoneEric Risberg/AP

In this photo taken Wednesday, Feb. 24, 2016, Russell Gipson Shearer displays the Whistle pet tracker, a GPS-enabled device, on his dog Rocket's collar at Dolores Park in San Francisco. Technology isn't just for humans. It's also for their furry friends. In Silicon Valley and beyond, a growing number of “pet-tech” startups are selling devices to keep pets safe, healthy, entertained and connected when their owners are away.


CHECK COLLARS AND TAGS

Even if your dog is staying home, double check to be sure its collar is securely on and in place and the information on its tags is up to date. A scared dog may be waiting at the door to dart away as soon as you return home.

If you find that the information on the tags is incorrect – and stores are closed because of the holiday, so fixing it on the whim won't work – here's a quick temporary hack using a Sharpie and some tape.

A more expensive and high-tech option is to get your dog a GPS-enabled tag tracker, that way if the animal gets away, the chances of finding it – and quick – are increasingly promising.

GIVE YOUR PET MEDS (WITH A VET'S GUIDANCE) 

The first prescription veterinary medicine for treating anxiety over loud noises has hit the market. A nice part about these meds is that its said to work quickly, but also to wear off in an appropriate amount of time.

According to the makers of the druga needless syringe is placed between the dog's gum and lip enabling the medicine to start working within 30 to 60 minutes, and last for two to three hours.

We hope that helps you and your furry-friends to have a happy Fourth of July.